Game On for NDIS Participants

 Game On NDIS Participants

Games are a modern model of people’s self-organisation to achieve a goal. Companies’ operational structure and models have been the same since the 19th Century, based on hierarchy, bureaucracy and specialisation of labour in order to scale and achieve efficient results. This model requires clearly defined roles and responsibilities, accurate procedures and management based on leadership and control, like in military organisations.
Keywords: NDIS; NDIA; gamification; participant management; models for NDIA; Models for GOAL TRACKING

However, in the modern world, these models restrain individual capability, the way tasks are demanded and the commitment with professional goals. Information Technology has created the possibility to organise work in a different way – through social aspects – and games are the platform that best fits as a tool for this new trend.

Datanova is pleased to participate in this transformation as a pioneer in viewing the NDIS and the use of Gamification. So, the challenge of introducing NDIS gamification for participants into an NDIS software program intends to face is set: considering the mechanisms originated by games, in contrast with current organisational procedures, as well as the way they influence the daily routine of the people involved, gamification can be used by NDIS Service providers to engage, socialise, motivate, teach and reporting to Government bodies and participants in an efficient way.

ndis participants gamification discussion artwork

GAMIFICATION NDIS PARTICIPANT

One of the primary responsibilities is to get the participants to produce desirable outcomes based on the NDIS plan through specific goals. To do this, many times one has to get them to actually change their behaviour patterns. The key principle to understand in changing participants’ behaviour is that you can’t change it for them; they must change it themselves. With that principle in mind, Government bodies and NDIS Service Providers Psychology (also known as IO psychology, occupational psychology is the scientific study of human behaviour in the workplace and applies psychological theories and principles to organisations.

NDIS Gamification logic to improve a goal, with the goal of fulfilling NDIA objectives.

There are many strategies like the use of social media, teleworking, big data analysis etc. that can be adopted. The strategy which we would be focussing on is Gamification for participants. Gamification is the application of game-playing elements to non-game environments like the NDIS, such as goal tracking, participant development and training. Simply put, gamification is the application of game mechanics and game design techniques to non-game, real-world objectives. It takes advantage of the psychological predisposition of humans to engage in gaming by applying the essence of games, goal-setting, achievement, recognition, and community – to Service Providers processes. Incorporates social context and location services to motivate and reward desired behaviours to reach goals and it encourages user engagement and adoption.

Although many individuals may naturally know what change management is, they, however, experience some challenges in conveying to others what it really means. Thus, the concept of change management is attached as a Google slideshow. However, in thinking about how to define change management, it is important at this juncture to provide a clear distinction between two related concepts – change management and project management. Below are their similarities and differences.

I’m very pleased to be writing about FlowLogic and FlowPoint introducing Gamification, dedicated to the use of game mechanics in the NDIS context.

ndis participants gamification scoreboard

FLOWLOGIC & FLOWPOINT TO INTRODUCE GAMIFICATION techniques

One of the primary responsibilities is to get the participants to produce desirable outcomes based on the NDIS plan through specific goals. To do this, many times one has to get them to actually change their behaviour patterns. The key principle to understand in changing participants’ behaviour is that you can’t change it for them; they must change it themselves. With that principle in mind, Government bodies and NDIS Service Providers Psychology (also known as IO psychology, occupational psychology is the scientific study of human behaviour in the workplace and applies psychological theories and principles to organisations.

NDIS Gamification logic to improve a goal, with the goal of fulfilling NDIA objectives

There are many strategies like the use of social media, teleworking, big data analysis etc. that can be adopted. The strategy which we would be focussing on is Gamification for participants. Gamification is the application of game-playing elements to non-game environments like the NDIS, such as goal tracking, participant development and training. Simply put, gamification is the application of game mechanics and game design techniques to non-game, real-world objectives. It takes advantage of the psychological predisposition of humans to engage in gaming by applying the essence of games, goal-setting, achievement, recognition, and community – to Service Providers processes. Incorporates social context and location services to motivate and reward desired behaviours to reach goals and it encourages user engagement and adoption.

Although many individuals may naturally know what change management is, they, however, experience some challenges in conveying to others what it really means. Thus, the concept of change management is attached as a Google slideshow. However, in thinking about how to define change management, it is important at this juncture to provide a clear distinction between two related concepts – change management and project management. Below are their similarities and differences.

I’m very pleased to be writing about FlowLogic and FlowPoint introducing Gamification, dedicated to the use of game mechanics in the NDIS context.

Flowlogic’s Gamification Features

To succeed, participants must embrace an end-to-end view that ties together gamification’s four components. Here’s an example of how gamification could be applied to a call center operations process

Objective: To improve goal and outcomes.
Mission: Achieve 10 points per day; receive positive support workers feedbacks;
Components:
Badges: Rewards are given daily and are displayed on weekly leaderboards and are displayed on an internal application, along with the participant’s profile. participants.
Certificates: Rewards are given to weekly or monthly leaders and are displayed on an internal application, along with the participant’s profile.
Challenges: Participants are measured by positive feedback per day or week.
>> Players: These are the participants in the gamification NDIS program;
>> Badges: Certificates, Trophies and Badges are a way of recognising NDIS participants who have achieved NDIS goals within a specific timeframe.
>> The Leader board is used for either individuals or teams, such as identifying reps with the maximum number of 10 points per day of each week. Badges with some level of intrinsic value need to be provided to leaders since virtual points are not perceived to have true value.

Design: NDIS participants are the players in this game, it’s important to emphasise ease of use. For example, intuitive process workflow and technical integration can ensure that participants don’t have to perform extra tasks to achieve badges. Other useful features — such as easy access on mobile devices for viewing leader boards and the ability to comment and share on badges — should be designed in from the getgo.

When applied well, gamification can greatly enhance your participant’s ability to meet NDIS objectives. By understanding the NDIS goal of your participants’ multiple missions and tactics, gamification can influence the desired behaviour, staff and NDIA Government bodies to achieve the objectives, optimise performance and improve outcome. Attention to these attributes will enable organisations to focus on business objectives, identify which processes to gamify and inform investment decisions for designing a successful program before moving to implementation.

Summary: Adding gaming mechanics to NDIS that acts as a goal-tracking tool that can improve outcomes across participants and identify leaders within the organisation. Employees can be rewarded for their contributions to the goals and outcomes, which helps the organisation not only increase adoption rates but also meet better Government NDIA objectives.

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Post Written by

The Founder of Datanova, a visionary and digital business solution architect with 24 years experience in the rapidly expanding fields of information management systems, data governance and customer focused-strategy. As Director of Datanova, he leads a great team focused on cloud based services and solutions improving a clients business result through enabling a competitive advantage from all their information assets to drive top business imperatives – Christian Krauter, is a recognised expert on analytical applications, CMS, CRM, focused on improving client’s business results through cloud development, information management and data governance.